Landlord / Tenant

Landlord’s Cannot Deny Prospective Tenants Based on Source of Income, effective September 30, 2018

Oftentimes, landlords require income verification from prospective tenants to better understand tenants’ financial circumstances and ability to make monthly rent payments. If you require such information from tenants, you should carefully review the new statewide “Source of Income” law (RCW 59.18.255) that becomes effective September 30, 2018. This new regulation includes guidelines and prohibitions for landlords when a prospective tenants’ source and amount of income is requested.

What Happens When a Tenant Doesn't Pay Rent?

As landlords in Washington State are well aware, the Landlord-Tenant Act (RCW 59.18 et seq.) and Seattle Just-Cause Eviction Ordinance (SMC 22.206 et seq.) are heavily weighted in favor of tenants’ rights. These laws have created a daunting and oft confusing legal process for landlords to navigate when an eviction becomes necessary. The first step in evicting a tenant is to place the tenant on notice that they are in default of their lease.  The type of default and issues surrounding the tenancy will dictate the type of notice a landlord is required to serve.

Interpretation of Indemnity Clauses

A February 2012 Washington State Supreme Court decision, Snohomish County Public Transportation Benefit Area Corp. v. First Group America, Inc., clarified how Washington courts are to interpret indemnification clauses. The facts of the case are interesting and the ruling provides a tie in to our daily work since indemnification clauses often arise in lease and purchase and sale negotiations.